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Posts Tagged ‘Fall Fashion’

People who take fashion seriously bore me to tears. The question mark-shaped models (stand up straight! for reals!), the frowny editors wearing head-to-toe designer (please be more creative, especially in this economy) trying fruitlessly to balance on their Louboutins, the rushed flacks who all seem to be losing their minds at the exact moment you catch a glimpse of their frantic faces. The scene, the whole thing is just so…tired. That’s why I’ve always been a fan of Alexander McQueen–the merry man of fashion. I used to stay up late when I was in my teens to watch his runway shows premiere on VideoFashion. Each season, he combined expertly tailored clothes with a show of unapologetically perverse storytelling and unencumbered wit. It was theater at its very finest. I still remember a Fall 2002 show replete with ghost-faced models leading wolves (or wolf-like dogs) through an open air, hauntingly lit, Victorian castle. The clothes fit the setting, yes, but these weren’t antique replicas–this was futuristic Goth with a splash of S &M (harnesses, breast plates, etc.). It was disturbing (in a fun creepy doll collection sort of way), but intensely elegant.

The Fall 2009 show conceived by McQueen was similarly filled with astonishing layers. The clothes themselves were gorgeously cut, as always, but they also incorporated a comedic element, in that the pieces and prints mocked the revelatory fashion inventions of the 20th century–Dior’s houndstooth separates, Chanel’s tweed, his own intense reds and burnt oranges and Hitchkockian Bird prints. Everything was exaggerated as though the clothes themselves were stage actors coated with a harsh layer of makeup meant to heighten the sweep of each feature. This was fashion’s last stand, if you will. The Brazil (the futuristic film, not the country)-inspired faces with their enormous rouged lips and non-existent brows depicted an after-the-rubble scenario: these clothes are fashion’s legacy; in the end, they’re utterly meaningless and might be worn by survivors with hubcap hats. At least, that’s my interpretation. Or, maybe McQueen was just having fun and the setting and accessories were done with no covert meaning and just entertainment in mind. Either way, fashion isn’t life, it’s just candy for the eyes and McQueen’s a master candy maker. (And no, the collection doesn’t remind me of Zoolander, silly fashion journalists.)

Re-assembled Dior worn with a hat made of what looks like medical gauze wrapped around aluminum cans! photo: style.com

Re-assembled Dior worn with a hat made of what looks like medical gauze wrapped around aluminum cans! photo: style.com

Those haunting faces under a hubcap hat; photo: style.com

Those haunting faces under a hubcap hat; photo: style.com

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